Archive | May, 2014

Weekly Round-Up: Memorial Day

Memorial Day

Photo Credit: Carry The Load

Welcome to the Words After War Weekly Round-Up: “Memorial Day” Edition. In this space we share links relevant to our mission of improving the military-civilian dialogue through high-quality literary programming.

This week, for Memorial Day, a number of moving essays were written that honored the sacrifice of our nation’s fallen. Let us read these essays and pause for a moment to honor all those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in service of our nation. Let us also honor the sacrifice of those families who will never again be whole. And tomorrow, as we continue on with our day-to-day, let us not forget that we are a country still at war.

Here we go.

  1. Alex Horton has penned an excellent piece for The Daily Beast on the kinds of lives his fallen friends might have lived.
  2. The Los Angeles Review of Books marks Memorial Day with a special series on war literature.
  3. For the New Republic, Elliot Ackerman writes about the “Extraordinary Bravery on the Streets of Fallujah.”
  4. The Washington Post ran a thought-provoking story about three wounded vets who found closure in Afghanistan.
  5. Buzzfeed’s Steve Kandell wrote a poignant essay on his visit to the 9/11 Memorial Museum, nearly thirteen years after his sister’s death.
  6. In The Daily Beast, vet writer Kate Hoit brings attention to the sacrifice of the nearly 200 women service members who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  7. For The Wall Street Journal, Phil Klay wrote an op-ed on why the nation needs to treat veterans with respect, not pity.

Have a good week.

–Brandon

Weekly Round-Up: Summer Writing Intensive

Summer Writing Intensive

Photo Credit: Marlboro College

Welcome to the Words After War Weekly Round-Up: “Summer Writing Intensive” Edition. In this space we share links relevant to our mission of improving the military-civilian dialogue through high-quality literary programming.

We’re happy to announce that we finalized a partnership with Marlboro College – my alma mater – to provide veterans and civilians with an opportunity to study writing for a week in a community of literary-minded folks. We are honored to co-sponsor the Summer Writing Intensive, and it means a great deal to us to have it held at Marlboro College, which had a significant influence in the founding of Words After War. Plus, for those of you who have never been, Vermont is paradise in August.

A few of us started this journey a little over a year ago, and we are now a community. This week in August will serve as validation that our literary community is both growing and also believes immensely in our mission. This will be an amazing opportunity for everyone, no matter your writing or education level. We hope to see many of you there, especially our military families.

Read our press release here, and find out more below:

Apply Now!

About the Summer Writing Intensive

Over the course of five days (Sun, Aug 3 – Fri, Aug 8, 2014), you will join a group of writers – professional writers, professors and other students interested in honing their craft – on the Marlboro Campus. You will participate in workshops during the day, and in the evenings you will write, talk and have fun with other writers. You will live in a dorm on Marlboro’s beautiful southern Vermont campus in the company of other program participants. Meals are included and served in the dormitory.

Workshops will include:

  • discussions of literature;
  • readings and workshops with professional writers of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry;
  • workshops to develop critiques of your own work;
  • sessions on drafting and editing with college faculty and other program participants.

Cost: The cost of the program, which includes all workshops, lodging and food, is $500.

In the spirit of Marlboro’s founders, all veterans, military spouses, gold star children, as well as those currently serving on active, reserve or guard duty are eligible for a Veteran’s Writing Grant which will entitle them to attend the Intensive at no cost.

Limited scholarships for non-veterans are also available.

The Veteran’s Writing Grant form and the non-veteran financial aid form is now available.

About Marlboro College

The Summer Writing Intensive grows out of Marlboro College’s fundamental commitment to writing. Marlboro was founded in 1946 by veterans returning from World War II who wanted to create a different kind of college—one where students were not only participants but also active contributors to the academic and community life of campus. Writing is at the core of the curriculum these veterans designed: Marlboro’s Clear Writing Requirement stems from the belief that clear writing leads to clear thinking, and means that clear writing in all its forms is a constant focus in the intellectual, political and social life of the Marlboro Community.

Learn more about the Writing Intensive’s lead faculty member, John Sheehy, and the application process for veterans hoping to complete a degree at Marlboro.

About Words After War

Co-founded by Brandon Willitts, veteran, writer and Marlboro alum, Words After War is a literary organization with a mission to change the national conversation around veteran issues by including civilians in that conversation. Through high-quality literary programming, Words After War provides veterans and civilians with opportunities to examine conflict and war through the lens of literature.

Questions? Contact the Ariel Brooks, Director of Non Degree Programs at abrooks@marlboro.edu or 802-451-7118.

Here we go.

  1. Elliot Ackerman penned an excellent piece for The Daily Beast on a Marine combat veteran who went to Syria and disappeared. According to Ackerman, groups of veterans are returning to the Middle East drawn by nostalgia for war, and for some of them it has brought about significant consequences for themselves and their families.
  2. Over on The Atlantic, you can see powerful images from WWI. Please be warned, many of these photos are graphic depictions of war violence.
  3. Military Times published a rather damning article on how now-retired Army Gen. David Petraeus misplaced the file of Army Capt. William Swenson, who received the Medal of Honor last year. And according to the Army’s Inspector General, Petraeus also recommended that the honor be downgraded to a Distinguished Service Cross.
  4. The Daily Beast has an exclusive article on how the CIA is dismantling its Afghan counterterrorist forces in the southern and eastern parts of the country. The tragic part of this situation is that we already know how it’s going to end. If you haven’t read it already, I highly recommend Steve Coll’s Ghost Wars for an in-depth understanding of the CIA’s involvement in Afghanistan from the late-1970’s to the early-2000’s.
  5. For the past few weeks, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) has been embroiled in controversy, leading some VSOs to call for the resignation of VA Secretary Shinseki. Jake Siegal wrote a terrific piece on the scandal for The Daily BeastPolitico ran an op-ed of support for Shinseki; and MSNBC got a smart take on the scandal by our friend, Ann Weeby.
  6. Adam Weinstein wrote a sad post for Gawker on Facebook’s refusal to remove the grisly series of photographs a Marine veteran had taken of his suicide, despite several requests from his friends and veterans’ organizations.
  7. Barnes and Noble Review published an interesting interview between the talented literary siblings, Benjamin and Jennifer Percy.

Have a great week.

–Brandon