Weekly Round-Up: Interlochen

Peter van Agtmael

Photo Credit: Peter van Agtmael

Welcome to the Words After War Weekly Round-Up: “Interlochen” Edition. In this space we share links relevant to our mission of improving the military-civilian dialogue through high-quality literary programming.

Big news this week: I drank my first iced coffee of the year. I’m going to enjoy every bit of these warmer days, and ready myself for the endless days of summer.

Speaking of summer, we are planning some amazing programs in a few different places. In NYC, there will be a June workshop for women – both vets and civilians – taught by Jen Percy and Mariette Kalinowski. Stay tuned for more info on that. In Vermont, we are in the planning stages of our most ambitious venture yet: a weeklong writing seminar during the first week of August. Details are still being finalized, but there’s much more to come on this soon.

In Michigan, join Words After War instructor Matt Gallagher at the Interlochen Writers Retreat during the second week of June. The esteemed Interlochen Center for the Arts was founded in 1928 and is located in northwest Michigan. Spend four days writing new material, attending craft talks by award-winning faculty, and enjoying lakeside lunches and evening readings, all while making connections in the literary world that will last for years to come.

Matt will be teaching “From Blog to Book,” a course designed to help students develop their blogging voice and sense of unified narrative, expanding their writing skill-set with the long-term purpose of turning their blog entries into book-length manuscripts.

The Writers Retreat runs from Monday, June 16 to Thursday, June 19, 2014. Registration information can be found here.

Jen Percy and Katey Schultz have both previously taught at Interlochen, so there’s a nice lineage of sorts for Words After War. If you have the vacation time available, you should spend it writing with Gallagher in Michigan.

Here we go.

  1. A decade after Pat Tillman’s death, many questions still remain unanswered. In this two-part video series for ESPN’s Outside the Lines, two of the soldiers present that day speak about the friendly fire incident that led to one of the most controversial moments in the U.S. war in Afghanistan.
  2. Stars and Stripes reported this week that special ops troops are committing suicide at a record pace. Adm. William McRaven, commander U.S. Special Operations Command, has stated that he’s making this his number one priority.
  3. In The Daily Beast, you can read an excerpt from the talented Jess Ruliffson’s “Invisible Wounds,” a graphic novel of illustrated first-person accounts from wounded veterans.
  4. The last few weeks have been an exercise in restraint, as more than a few articles were published that painted veterans with rather broad and inaccurate brushstrokes. As a response, the New York Daily News did a pretty good job at trying to undo the smear campaign brought on by the opinion pages of Guernica, The Nation, New York Times, and many others.
  5. For The Daily Beast, Thomas Gibbons-Neff, marine vet and writer, examines why the PTSD media narrative after Fort Hood has only divided us as a nation.
  6. For The New Yorker’s “Page-Turner” blog, James Salter remembers Peter Matthiessen.
  7. Syria is the most dangerous place in the world for journalists. In the May edition of Vanity Fair, James Harkin reports on the disappearance of journalists – Austin Tice and Jim Foley – who went missing in 2012 while reporting in Syria.

Last word: If you are looking for a great new book to buy, check out Peter van Agtmael’s Disco Night Sept 11, a powerful book of photographs and vignettes detailing the human cost of war. And if you are in Brooklyn this Thursday, 4/24/2014, check out “Women and War: Helen Benedict, Cara Hoffman, and Katey Schultz,” a discussion at WORD bookstore.

Enjoy your week.

–Brandon

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